Snowboarding Trick names and Terminology

 

Trick names and snowboarding terminology in general are controversial issues. And the main reason for debate is because snowboarding is a rebel sport, snowboarders like to bend the rules. And standardization has failed to overpower this.

But we still need the terminology, because without it, think how much of a pain it would be to talk about snowboarding, or brag about that new trick you learned!

So the main focus of this page is to eliminate the confusion of trick names and put everyone on the same page. This way we all can focus on having fun, instead of arguing over what a trick is called.

 

We want to make this trick list/dictionary the most thorough and accurate available. So if you disagree with a trick name or know of one that’s missing from the list, please let us know!

Just write to theactioncrew@yahoo.com

 

 

 

Trick Dictionary

Note: there are a lot of snowboarding specific terms used to describe the tricks, so if you don't know what something means, click here to check out the Terminology section!

 

Table of Contents

 

 

 

Basic Tricks:

 

Ollie:

The most fundamental and basic trick in snowboarding. An Ollie is where the rider springs off the tail of the snowboard and launches into the air. Ollies can be done on flat ground, or off of jumps or other obstacles.

 

Nollie:

The same as an ollie but the rider pops into the air off the nose of the snowboard instead of the tail.

 

Flatland Tricks:

 

Shuffle: (aka Duck Walk)

Usually done on flat-ground or uphill, The motion is basically walking while strapped in to a snowboard. To do this, the rider shifts from side to side, alternately springing off the nose and tail of the snowboard, to propel themselves forward in a walking like fashion.

Note: Shufflin is not technically a trick, but... some people do it everyday.

 

Tail roll and nose roll:

To pivot a 180° on the snow by pressuring the nose or tail of the snowboard and rotating around.

 

Tap off:

Quickly tapping your tail or nose on the end of the rail/box or other jib as you are about to slide off of it.

 

Wheelie:

Definitely not a snowboarding trick, because snowboards don’t have wheels.

 

Manuel:

Riding straight forward while lifting the nose of the snowboard off the snow, so your riding with only the tail touching the snow. In order for this trick to be done properly, the manual position must be maintained for some time, the longer it is held, the better and cooler it becomes.

When this trick is done on a jib it becomes a Tail Press.

 

Nose-Manuel:

Riding straight forward while lifting the tail of the snowboard off the snow, so your riding with only the nose touching the snow. In order for this trick to be done properly, the nose-manual position must be maintained for some time, the longer it is held, the better and cooler it becomes.

When this trick is done on a jib it becomes a Nose Press.

 

Butter: (tail butter, nose butter, buttering)

While traveling along the surface of the snow or a flat box, this trick is performed by pressuring either the nose or tail of the snowboard in such a way that the opposite half of the snowboard lifts off of the surface, allowing for a pivot-like rotation. A butter can be performed as a partial rotation (90°), which is then reverted, as a continuous rotation (180°, 360°, etc.), or as a lead-in to an aerial maneuver.

 

Stalls:

 

Board-stall: (aka stall)

A trick performed when a rider stalls on an object with his snowboard, with the point of contact between both bindings.

One variation is the;

 

Disaster:

Performed on a wallride, halfpipe, quarterpipe or other obstacle. A trick where the rider, spins 180 degrees, lands and stalls on the top of the transition, wall or other feature, with only the middle of their board touching. After stalling, they lean forward and ride down the transition they approached on.

 

Nose-stall:

Stalling on the nose of the snowboard at the top of a transition or obstacle.

 

Tail-stall:

This trick involves riding up a transition, rotating the snowboard 180 degrees, stalling on the top (or obstacle above) with the tail of the snowboard, and re-entering the transition either straight, or rotating 180 degrees to re-enter fakie (Tails-stall to fakie). The difference between tail and blunt stalls is; in a tail stall, the nose of the board is sticking back over the transition. Whereas a blunt stall has the nose hanging over the lip or obstacle.

 

Blunt stall:

Performed by riding up to an object, poking the nose of the board all the way over it and stalling on the tail of the board.

 

Nose-Blunt Stall:

Performed by riding up to an object, spinning 180 degrees, poking the tail of the board all the way over the object and stalling on the nose of the board.

 

Double-Blunt Stall:

Either a tail blunt stall directly into a nose blunt stall on the same object, or vice versa.

 

Tail-block:

A trick typically performed on the snow, or occasionally on an object, in which the snowboarder springs up and stands on the tail of his board while grabbing the nose of the board.

 Burton Academy at Northstar Trick Tip Video

 

Nose-block

Similar to a tail-block, but performed by standing on the nose while grabbing the tail of the board.

 

Nose-pick:

Stalling on an object with the nose of the snowboard, while grabbing indy, and then jumping back off the object into the transition you came off.

 

 

Spins:

 

The name of spins is the amount spun in 180 degree increments, plus the direction of rotation. The direction can be either backside or frontside. Example: Frontside 360.

The direction is determined by which way the rider is facing in the first 90 degrees of the spin (very start of spin). If the rider is facing downhill in the first 90 degrees, its frontside, if the rider is facing uphill, its backside.

 

180 (one-eighty)

A 180 is the smallest spin, the rider spins 180 degrees and lands backwards.

 

360 (three-sixty)

One full rotation, where you spin all the way around once (360 degrees), and land the same way you started.

Erin Comstock BS 360 Trick Tip Video

 

540 (five-forty)

One and a half rotations, (540 degree spin). You land backwards.

 

720 (seven-twenty)

Two complete rotations (720 degree spin) you land the same way you started.

FS 720 Trick Tip Video

 

And after this it just keeps going, in 180 degree increments, switching off between landing forward and switch. The next one after 720 is 900, then 1080, 1260, 1440, and finally the biggest spin ever performed on a snowboard, the 1620. First pulled off by Ulrik Badertscher in September of 2009.

 

Note names of spins are usually abbreviated to the first number, so a 180 would be called a 1. a 360 would be 3 and so on, until you get to 1080 from then on it's usually abbreviated with the first 2 numbers such as a "front 10".

 

Cab Spins:

The Cab was originally a skateboarding trick invented and named by Steve Caballero in 1981.

When snowboarders first started doing it, it referred to a switch frontside 360 in the halfpipe.

Now in snowboarding, the meaning of the term Cab has been broadened to mean any switch frontside spin, off any feature, besides a switch frontside 180, which is called a Half-Cab. For Example; instead of saying “Switch Frontside 720”, you would say “Cab 720”. Its easier to say, and sounds pretty cool.

 

 

Jump / Aerial Tricks:

 

Straight Air:

Going straight over a jump without turning or spinning.

 

Shifty: (Frontside Shifty)

Rider airs and shifts (turns) his/her snowboard 90 degrees frontside so that the toe edge is facing forward (downhill), then shifts it back 90 degrees to land the same direction they took off. This is a very simple trick if the rider knows the technique of counter-rotation.

 

Backside Shifty:

Same as a Shifty but the rider shifts their board 90 degrees backside so that the heel edge faces forward (downhill) instead of frontside, making the trick more difficult. Rider must counter-rotate so they can shift back without spinning all the way around.

 

Shifty Rewind: (not to be confused with revert)

To do this trick the rider shiftys one direction and then spins the opposite direction. For example: a Shifty Rewind Backside 180, would be a Frontside Shifty, into a backside 180.

 

Shifty Shifty:

A trick where the rider spins one direction, then shiftys back the other direction, Then does another shifty in the direction he/she was initially traveling.

For example: a Frontside 360 Shifty Shifty: The rider starts spinning frontside, and stops his shoulders spinning at about 90 degrees, but his board continues to spin to 270 degrees, this is the first shifty. The rider then releases their shoulders and continues spinning frontside while shifting the board backside (opposite of first shifty). The second shifty stalls the shoulders at about 180 degrees, then the board is shifted back frontside and the whole body finishes the last 180 degrees of the frontside 360.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uH5IfTg7uK4

 

Cork (corkscrew)

Cork is the general term used to describe any aerial spin that is off-axis (sideways).

Click here to see list and definitions of different corks.

 

Invert:

Any maneuver, such as flips or hand plants, where the riders goes inverted (completely upside down).

 

Backflip:

The general term for any backwards flipping invert, where the rider does not spin around, but lands the same direction he/she started the trick.

There are several types of backflips including:

Back-Barrel Roll: (aka backroll)

A common variation, where the rider approaches the jump (or other obstacle) flat based, then launches into a flip, backwards, straight over the heel-side of the snowboard. This is the closest to a true back-flip motion.

Wildcat:

A variation of the backflip, unique to snowboarding. The rider approaches the jump (or other obstacle) flat based and then launches into a side flip straight over the tail of the snowboard. Called a backflip, because the rider flips backwards of the direction they are traveling.

Any variation between a wildcat and a Back-Barrel Roll is just called a; Backflip:

For example: some riders turn 45 or even 90 degrees and backflip towards the take-off, then rotate back and ride away straight.

 

Laid-out Backflip:

A backflip where the rider stretches out straight (lays out) and arches his back as much as possible. This is one of the only tricks which is done without a grab, and looks excellent that way. Arms can be to the side, but most often are held straight out to the side. This trick requires a big jump and a lot of hang time.

 

Frontflip:

The general term for any forwards flipping invert, where the rider does not spin around, but lands the same direction he/she started the trick.

There are several types of frontflips including:

 

Front-Barrel Roll:

Rider approaches the jump (or other obstacle) flat based, then launches into a flip, forwards over the toe-edge of the snowboard. This is the closest to a true front-flip rotation, but is not the most common front flip on a snowboard.

 

Tamedog:

A trick unique to snowboarding, and what most people think of when they hear “snowboarding front flip”. Rider approaches the obstacle flat based, then launches forward, into a cartwheel like side flip, directly over the nose of the snowboard. This trick is probably the most commonly done flip on a snowboard, because it can be done off pretty much anything; jumps, rails, even flat ground if you can pop hard enough. This is because, the rider is flipping in the same direction they are traveling, so they can flip faster and get more pop than any other flip.

The tamedog front flip didn’t get its name because it's an awesome name, it got named that because its like the wildcat backflip, and someone thought; hmm whats the opposite of a wild cat?... oh yeah, a tame dog, and the name stuck.

 

Superman front flip:

Yep it can be done. The rider pops off the nose, like a tame dog, stretches out straight and turns slightly, so that their face and torso are facing straight forward/downhill (the board is usually only turned about 45degrees). The rider try’s to stay stretched out, with their body horizontal (mimicking superman flying) for as long as possible, then tucks, and flips over forward at the last second. At the end of the flip, as the rider spots their landing, they turn back, and land in the same position they took off.

 

Rodeo: Either a backside spin + back-barrel roll, or a frontside spin + front-barrel roll. This trick is a complete invert with a spin, so the rotation of the invert (barrel-roll) is added to the rotation of the spin. For example: a back-barrel roll(which is 360 degrees of rotation) mixed with a backside 180, would be called a backside rodeo 540 (360+180=540) (abbreviated; bs rodeo 5).

 

Underflip:

Either a backside spin + front-barrel roll, or a frontside spin + back-barrel roll. This trick is a complete invert with a spin, so the rotation of the invert (barrel-roll) is added to the rotation of the spin. For example: a back-barrel roll(which is 360 degrees of rotation) mixed with a frontside 180, would be called a frontside underflip 540 (360+180=540) (abbreviated; fs underflip 5).

note: backside underflips are mistakenly called misty flips by many people.

Stale Sandbech - triple underflip 1260

 

 

Misty Flip:

Misty is a general, non-sport specific term used to describe a spinning invert, that is initiated by flipping forward, in other words flipping in the direction that you are traveling. Some people get this confused and describe Misty's as spinning front flips, but this is incorrect. The flip motion starts out forward and then changes direction as the person twist.

A Misty Flip in snowboarding is a Tamedog with a spin. The rider approaches the jump (or other obstacle) flat based and pops of the nose of the snowboard, launching into a forward (downhill) flip. The rider then twist his head and shoulders either frontside or backside. Misty Flips are complete inverts, so when determining the rotation of the trick, you add the rotation of the inversion (360 degrees) to the rotation of the spin, commonly 180 or 360, making it a Misty 540 or Misty 720.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n2xrHnxuEEM

 

Whats the difference between Corks, Underflip's, Rodeo's and Misty Flips?

 

When doing an Underflip, the rider flips under in a smooth motion, away form the landing and towards the take off point. In a Rodeo the rider flips over towards the landing and away from the take off point.

 

Misty Flips are initiated by popping forward off the nose of the snowboard, not an edge.

 

Single Corks (double corks include inverts) are off axis spins, so basically they are Underflips or Rodeos where you don’t go completely inverted (upside down). For example: when you do an Underflip 540, your doing an invert (360 degrees flipping rotation) mixed with a 180 degree spin. Now when you do the same thing, but don't go completely inverted, it causes you to spin more, making it a Cork 540, so you don’t have the 360 off the invert, but you spin a complete 540, instead of just 180.

 

Basic Frontside and Backside Corks have the same kind of setup as Underflips. When you setup and take-off like a rodeo you have to add which edge you took-off as an identifier, i.e. frontside cork off the toes (toe-edge), or backside cork off the heels (heel-edge).

 

Backside Cork:

Like a Backside Underflip but not inverted. Initiated with a forward corking backside spin. The rider approaches on the toe-edge, and throws their front shoulder backwards and downwards, initiating the cork. (if they threw both shoulders down, it would send them inverted into an underflip)

 

Frontside Cork:

A non-inverted Frontside Underflip. Initiated with a backward corking frontside spin. The rider approaches on the heel-edge, and throws their front shoulder backwards and downwards initiating the cork (if they threw both shoulders back, it would send them inverted into a underflip)

 

Backside Cork off the heels: (aka Corked Backside Rodeo)

Probably the least common cork, which is a non-inverted Backside Rodeo. Rider spins backside off the heel edge, and tilts their trailing shoulder back and their head slightly up, to initiate the cork.

 

Frontside Cork off the toes: (aka Corked Frontside Rodeo)

A fairly uncommon cork, which is a non-inverted Frontside Rodeo. Rider spins frontside off the toe edge, and throws their trailing shoulder forward and down, to initiate the cork.

 

 

Double Corks:

The general term used to describe any aerial maneuver where the rider goes corked or inverted 2 distinct times while spinning.

 

Double Cork is a general term that includes; Double Corks, Double Rodeos, or Double Underflips.

The initiation of the Trick, and if the rider flips or corks is the key to determining which variation of the trick is being performed.

Note: The following definitions explain doubles off jumps, there are more variations in the halfpipe because of the backside and frontside wall. Click here for halfpipe doubles explained.

 

Double Corks: (specific variations, not broad term)

Backside Double Corks are initiated backside spinning and forward corking.

Frontside Double Corks are initiated frontside spinning and backwards corking.

 

Double Rodeos: (Double Cork variations)

The backside double rodeo is initiated either backside spinning while backwards flipping, or with a Back-Barrel Roll.

The Frontside Double Rodeo is initiated with either frontside spinning while forward flipping, or a Front-Barrel Roll.

Note: The dub rodeos that are initiated with a Barrel-Roll look strikingly different from the others. Riders will either barrel-roll straight over once, then into a cork, or barrel-roll straight over twice, then spin at the end.

 

Double Underflips: (Double Cork variations)

The Backside Double Underflip is initiated either backside spinning while forwards flipping, or with a Front-Barrel Roll.

The Frontside Double Underflip is initiated with either frontside spinning while backwards flipping, or a Back-Barrel Roll.

Note: The dub underflips that are initiated with a Barrel-Roll look striking different from the others. Riders will either barrel-roll straight over once, then into a cork, or barrel-roll straight over twice, then spin at the end.

 

 

How do you tell how much rotation is in a double cork?

If the inverts (flips) are a distinct rotation in themselves, and not blended to much with the spin, you add the invert rotations (a single invert is 360 degrees) to the spin rotations. Some Double Corks involve no distinct inverts, only corks (off-axis spin), some have only 1 distinct invert and 1 cork, and some have 2 distinct inverts.

For example; a Double Cork 1080 could be any of the following;

1. A 360 degree spin with 2 distinct inverts, (each invert is 360 degrees, equaling 720, plus the 360 spin makes it 1080).

2. A 720 degree spin with 1 distinct invert (360 degrees of rotation), and 1 cork (the cork is part of the 720 spin)

3. A 1080 degree spin where the rider goes corked (off-axis) twice.

 

 

Triple Corks. (specifically: Triple Corks, Triple Underflips and Triple Rodeos)

Same as the Doubles but with an an additional cork or invert.

Stale Sandbech - triple underflip 1260

Seb Toots Backside Triple Cork 1440

 

How do you tell how much rotation is in a Triple Cork?

The same way you determine it in doubles.

 

 

Grabs:

 

Grabs are essential for adding style. Airing without grabbing your board tends to look sloppy and awkward, unless your doing a laid-out backflip or something like that.

The different ways you can grab your board are endless! So lets begin with:

 

The Basic Grabs:

 

Indy:

Usually the first grab anyone learns because its one of the easiest. Its pretty simple, just grab between your bindings on the toe-edge of your board with your back hand. For added style; bone-out one leg.

Used to be called Frontside Grab, but no one really calls it that anymore cause indy is easier and funner to say. Think of it like this; which would you rather say? “iPod” or “portable music player”? Or which sounds cooler; “i cranked up the volume on my ipod and threw an indy over the first hit” or “i increased the volume on my portable music player and proceeded to perform a frontside grab when I became airborne off the first jump”

 

Mute:

The same as an indy but with your front hand instead of back hand. Just grab between your bindings on the toe-edge of your board with your front hand. For added style; bone-out one leg.

 

Melon (Melancholy):

Grab the heel-edge between the bindings with your front hand by reaching behind your front leg, not through the legs, that’s a “chicken salad” which is harder. Oh and bone that front leg!

 

Stalefish:

Like a Melon grab, but grabbing with your backhand. Grab the heel-edge between the bindings with your back hand by reaching behind your back leg, not through the legs, that’s a “roast beef” which is harder.

 

Nose-grab:

Suck up that front foot, poke out the back foot, and grab the nose of your board with your front hand. If you really bone that back foot, it will bring your nose closer, making it easier to grab and adding tons of style!

 

Tail Grab:

Suck up that back foot, poke out the front foot, and grab the tail of your board with your front hand. If you really bone that front foot, it will bring your tail closer, making it easier to grab and adding tons of style!

 

Other snowboarding Grabs:

 

Method:

By far the most famous grab in snowboarding!

A fundamental trick performed by bending the knees to lift the board so that the base is verical, and grabbing the heel edge of the snowboard with the leading hand either right behind or right infront of the front binding. When doing a Method you must pull the board in front of you backside shifty style so that the base of your board is facing forward, perpendicular to the direction in which you are traveling. Just bending your knees and grabing behind you back doesn't count.

 

 

Japan:

A stylish grab, where the rider reaches around their front leg to grab the toe-edge between the bindings, with their front hand. Once the rider has the grab, they pull the board back and up behind them. The more the board is tweaked behind the rider, the better the trick looks.

 

Taipan:

A variation of the Japan grab. The difference is in arm placement. The rider will reach their front hand through their legs from behind to grab, instead of around the front leg.

 

Crail:

Rider reaches across front of body and grabs in front of the front binding with their rear hand. This has caused some confusion, because in skateboarding the rider grabs to nose of the board on the toe-side. This is because skateboards are short, so grabbing right in front of the front foot would be grabbing the nose, which is not the case with snowboards.

 

Nuclear:

Similar to crail, but opposite edge. Rider reaches across front of body with rear hand, and grabs the heel-edge in front of the front binding.

 

Tail-Crail:

Rider reaches across front of body and grabs behind the back binding with their front hand.

 

Atomic:

Similar to tail-crail, but opposite edge. Rider reaches across front of body with front hand, and grabs the heel-edge in back of the back binding.

 

Seatbelt:

Rider reaches across front of body and grabs either; nose with rear hand, or tail with front hand, mimicking the motion of putting on your seat-belt in a vehicle.

Specifically:

Nuclear Seatbelt:

Rider reaches across front of body with their back hand and grabs the nose of their snowboard.

Atomic Seatbelt:

Rider reaches across front of body with their front hand and grabs the tail of their snowboard.

 

Bloody Dracula:

A trick in which the rider grabs the tail of the board with both hands. The rear hand grabs the board as it would during a regular tail-grab but the front hand blindly reaches for the board behind the riders back.

 

Flying squirrel:

Both hands reach behind the heelside and (tweak) the board behind his/her riders back.

 

Swiss cheese:

The rear hand reaches between the legs and grabs the heel edge in front of the front foot while the back leg is boned.

 

Slob:

A mute grab where the back leg is boned straight.

 

Goomba:

Back hand grabs nose of the board around the back.

 

Rocket:

Both hands grab the nose of the board simultaneously

 

Cross Rocket:

An advanced variation of the rocket, where the rider grabs nose with both hands while crossing their arms.

 

Tail-Rocket:

Both hands grab the tail of the board simultaneously

 

Tail Cross Rocket:

An advanced variation of the tail-rocket, where the rider grabs tail with both hands while their arms are crossed.

 

Truck Driver:

The rider either grabs Mute and Stalefish at the same time, or the rider grabs Indy (frontside) and Melon at the same time.

 

 

Mindy:

Rider grabs mute and indy simultaneously.

 

Gorilla:

Front hand grabs toe-edge in front of the front binding, while rear hand grabs toe-edge behind back binding, imitating the stance of a gorilla.

 

Roast Beef:

Rider reaches between their legs with their back hand and grabs the heel edge in between the bindings.

 

Chicken Salad:

Rider reaches between their legs with their front hand and grabs the heel edge in between the bindings.

 

Beef Carpaccio:

A Roast Beef and Chicken Salad at the same time with hands crossed.

 

Beef Curtains:

A Roast Beef and Chicken Salad at the same time.

 

 

Cannonball:

Rider grabs Nose and Tail simultaneously.

 

Jib / Rail & Box Tricks:

 

Spins:

The name of spins is the amount spun in 180 degree increments, plus the direction of rotation. The direction can be either backside or frontside. Now this gets tricky when dealing with jibs, because you can land on the jib, perpendicular to the direction your traveling, adding up to a different amount of rotation then normal. Plus Frontside and Backside are different when your only spinning 90 degrees.

 

First we'll look at how to determine the amount of rotation.

In a regular spin, you spin in 180 degree increments and land straight. If you spin onto a jib and land perpendicular to the direction you are traveling, you still spin in 180 degree increments but you start adding them up from 90degrees instead of zero. Because a Boardslide or Lipslide which is rotated 90degrees is not considered a spin.

So the names of spins where you land perpendicular to the direction your traveling are the rotation of the spin in 180 degree increments starting at 90 degrees i.e. 270 (90+180), 450 (270+180), 630 (450+180), and so on.

 

Now I will explain Frontside and Backside while jibbing.

Frontside and backside are always the same when spinning, even onto jibs. The only time they are different is when you don’t rotate or only rotate 90 degrees into a Boardslide, because technically your not spinning, your shifting. We blame this on skateboarding, where snowboarders stole the names from. In Skateboarding you usually jump onto a rail from the side, so when you jump onto a rail from the side, with it in front of you (toe edge), its called frontside, if its behind you (heel edge) when you jump on, its called backside. Makes sense? Good.

 

Backside Boardslide (aka “regular boardslide”, “back board” or just “boardslide”)

A regular stance rider (left foot forward) would approach the rail (or other jib) with it on their backside (skiers left) then jump and bring their front foot over the rail, shifting their board 90 degrees frontside, land on the rail (perpendicular to it) facing downhill. When the rider reaches the end of the rail they shift the board back.

This trick can be performed without approaching from the side. In this case the rider will approach the rail (or other jib) straight on, and shift the board 90 degrees frontside, slide the rail perpendicular to it, then shift back.

 

Frontside Boardslide (aka “front board”)

A regular stance rider (left foot forward) would approach the rail (or other jib) with it on their frontside (skiers right) then jump and bring their front foot over the rail, shifting their board 90 degrees backside, land on the rail (perpendicular to it) with their toe edge facing uphill. When the rider reaches the end of the rail they shift the board back. To make it a proper front board, the rider will twist his head around to look downhill while sliding, instead of blindly sliding backwards.

This trick can be performed without approaching from the side. In this case the rider will approach the rail (or other jib) straight on, and shift the board 90 degrees backside, slide the rail perpendicular to it, then shift back.

 

Frontside Lipslide: (aka “front lip”)

A regular stance rider (left foot forward) would approach the rail (or other jib) with it on their frontside (skiers right) then jump and bring their back foot over the rail, shifting their board 90 degrees frontside, land on the rail (perpendicular to it) facing downhill. When the rider reaches the end of the rail they shift the board back.

This trick can only be performed by jumping on from the side, if you jump, or ride on straight, this motion is called a Backside Boardslide.

 

Backside Lipslide: (aka back lip)

A regular stance rider (left foot forward) would approach the rail (or other jib) with it on their backside (skiers left) then jump and bring their back foot over the rail, shifting their board 90 degrees backside, land on the rail (perpendicular to it) with their toe edge facing uphill. When the rider reaches the end of the rail they shift the board back. To make it a proper Back Lip, the rider will twist his head around to look downhill while sliding, instead of blindly sliding backwards.

This trick can only be performed by jumping on from the side, if you jump, or ride on straight, this motion is called a Frontside Boardslide.

 

Smith Grind: (zeached Lipslide on a snowboard)

A skateboarding specific trick, if done on a snowboard would look like you tried a Lipslide and failed. Plus you if your grinding on a snowboard and not sliding, something is seriously wrong!

 

Feeble Grind: (zeached Boardslide on a snowboard)

A skateboarding specific trick, if done on a snowboard would look like you tried a Boardslide and failed. Plus you if your grinding on a snowboard and not sliding, something is seriously wrong!

 

Blunt slide: (aka Blunt)

Basically a Boardslide where you land and slide on the tail, with the rest of the board hanging off the rail or other jib. Can be performed Frontside or Backside. Note: in order to do this trick the rider must approach alongside the rail, and bring their front foot over it. It is a Tail slide if the rider approaches straight on, or rides up from either side, and swings the tail of the board over the rail, instead of the nose.

 

Nose Blunt Slide: (aka Nose Blunt)

Basically a Lipslide where you land and slide on the nose, with the rest of the board hanging off the rail or other jib. Can be performed Frontside or Backside. Note: in order to do this trick the rider must approach alongside the rail, and bring their back foot over it. It is a Nose slide if the rider approaches straight on, or rides up from either side, and swings the nose of the board over the rail, instead of the tail.

 

Nose slide:

Basically a Boardslide where you land and slide on the nose, with the rest of the board hanging off the rail or other jib. Can be performed Frontside or Backside.

 

 

Tail slide:

Basically a Lipslide where you land and slide on the tail, with the rest of the board hanging off the rail or other jib. Can be performed Frontside or Backside.

 

Tailpress:

A Manuel sliding straight over a box, rail, log or other jib. Done by lifting the nose of the board in the air so that the tail is the only part touching the obstacle. In order for this trick to be called a tailpress, the rider must maintain the position the entire time they are on the obstacle. The higher the nose is lifted, the better! If its not lifted very much, it makes the trick extremely lame!

 

5/0 grind: (five oh)

A skateboarding trick, where the skater grinds a rail on just the rear trucks. And the incorrect term for a Tailpress snowboarding.

 

Nosepress:

A Nose-Manuel sliding straight over a box, rail, log or other jib. Done by lifting the tail of the board in the air so that the nose is the only part touching the obstacle. In order for this trick to be called a nosepress, the rider must maintain the position the entire time they are on the obstacle. The higher the nose is lifted, the better! If its not lifted very much, it makes the trick extremely lame!

 

50/50 slide: (aka fifty fifty)

A slide performed by riding straight over a rail, box or other jib, parallel to it. Can be performed Frontside or Backside if the rider approaches along side the rail instead of straight on. Example: for a Frontside 50/50 the rider would approach with the rail on their front side and jump onto it (from the left side for a regular rider, and from the right side for a goofy rider) and ride straight down it.

 

MJ: (aka Michael Jackson)

A slide that somewhat resembles a 50-50, a rider slides along an obstacle on nothing but the toe-edge of their snowboard. reminiscent of a dance move made popular by Michael Jackson.

 

Zeach:

The “cool” version: A slide where the snowboard is 45 degrees to the rail, box or other jib. Proper Zeaches are performed when the riders front or back foot is directly over the rail or other jib. Can be done frontside or backside. The Zeach was made popular by professional snowboarder Zach Leach in the early 2000's, hence the name Zeach.

What most people think of this trick: A failed attempt at a “real” trick. Because its what people do naturally when they aren't skilled enough to do boardslides, or other perpendicular slides properly.

 

Bonk:

To puposely hit something with your snowboard. Also a jib obstacle made too be bonked.

 

Pretzel:

Spinning 270 or more degrees off a jib, in the opposite direction that you spun onto it.

 

Sameway:

Like a Pretzel, but you spin 270 or more degrees off the jib, in the same direction that you spun onto it.

 

Backcountry Tricks:

 

Powder Slash:

Turning through fresh powder while spraying up as much snow as you can.

 

Cliff Drop:

Airing over a rock face while dropping at least 25 vertical feet.

 

 

 

Halfpipe / Quarter Pipe Specific Tricks:

 

Frontside Air:

Rider approaches on the toe-edge and airs out of the frontside wall, which is the left wall for goofy riders, or the right wall for regular riders. While airborne, the riders front-side is facing out of the halfpipe. Usually performed with a frontside grab (also called indy grab). Regular riders land regular, goofy riders land goofy, no spinning.

 

Backside Air:

Rider approaches on the heel-edge and airs out of the backside wall, which is the right wall for goofy riders, or the left wall for regular riders. While airborne, the riders back-side is facing out of the halfpipe. Regular riders land regular, goofy riders land goofy, no spinning.

 

Air-to-fakie:

Airing straight out of a vertical transition (halfpipe, quarterpipe) and then re-entering fakie, without spinning.

Torah Bright Air to Fakie Trick Tip Video

 

 

Poptart:

Airing from fakie to forward on a quarterpipe or halfpipe without rotation.

 

 

Alley oop:

A spin performed in a halfpipe in which the spin is rotated in the opposite direction of the air. i.e. rotating backside on the frontside wall, or rotating frontside on the backside wall.

 

 

 

Flips in the pipe:

 

Backside Rodeo:

Taking off of toes on the frontside wall, rider rotates backside, and backflips down the pipe rotating 540 or 720 degrees.

 

Heelside Ally-Oop Rodeo:

Taking off the heels on the backside wall, rider rotates frontside and backflips while rotating either 540 or 720 degrees.

 

 

Frontside Rodeo:

Frontside spin mixed with a front-barrel roll type flip.

 

McTwist:

A forward-flipping backside 540, performed in a halfpipe, quarterpipe, or similar obstacle. The rotation may continue beyond 540° (e.g., McTwist 720). The origin of this trick comes from vert ramp skateboarding, and was first performed on a skateboard by Mike McGill.

 

Ally-Oop McTwist:

Taking off of toe side wall, rider rotates backside, up the pipe and flips uphill and forward into a McTwist.

 

Wet Cat:

A variation of the McTwist but with a 900° spin. Invented by Todd Richards

 

Haakonflip:

The Haakonflip is named after Terje Haakonsen, the snowboarding legend. It is technically an inverted switch frontside 720. The Haakonflip is done off of the switch frontside wall as a cab 360 with a back flip or side flip or blend of the X and Y Axis. The switch frontside wall is the left wall for regular footers, and the right wall for goofy footers. The Hakkonflip 720 takes off switch and land forward, the Haakon 9 takes off switch and land switch, and the Haakon 1080 is a full Cab 720 + flip on an X Y axis blend.

 

Michalchuk:

A trademark flip first performed in the halfpipe by Michael Michalchuk. A wildcat backflip with a 540 degree spin, and often performed with a melon, indy or method grab. Rotation is backside off the backside wall.

 

Crippler:

A general term for an inverted frontside 5, 7 or 9 with most commonly a back flip and sometimes more of a side flip blended into it.


Sato Flip:

The Sato Flip is a specific type of Crippler 540. Used by the likes of Rob Kingwill, and Gretchen Bleiler. the Sato Flip is a frontside 90 to side flip on the Y Axis.


KassaRoll:

The Kassaroll is another specific type of Crippler that was named by the brother of Halfpipe Great Danny Kass, Matt. Matt Kass used to do this trick so big and stylish, that it had to be named after him. It is again a crippler 540 only this time it is a frontside 90 to back flip on the X Axis.

 

Handplants: (usually in the halfpipe or quarter pipe, but can be done on other obstacles)

 

Handplant: any trick where the rider goes inverted while putting his hand/hands on the snow.

 

 

Handplant:

A 180° degree handplant in which the rear hand is planted on the lip of the wall and the rotation is frontside.

 

 

Sad plant:

An invert with a sad grab (melon grab).

 

 

Elguerial:

An invert where the halfpipe wall is approached fakie, the rear hand is planted, a 360 degree backside rotation is made, and the rider lands going forward. Named after Eddie Elguera.

 

 

Eggplant:

A one-handed 180° invert in which the front hand is planted on the lip of the wall and the rotation is backside.

 

 

Eggflip:

An eggplant where the rider chooses to flip over in order to re-enter the pipe instead or rotating 180 degrees. This trick is performed forward to fakie or switch (fakie to forward).

 

 

McEgg:

An invert where the rider plants the front hand on the wall, rotated 540 degrees in a backside direction and lands riding forward.

 

 

Andrecht:

A rear handed backside handplant with a front-handed grab.

 

 

Layback:

A non-inverted handplant in which the leading hand is planted during a slide. The rider literally lays back, hence the name.

 

 

HoHo:

An invert but both hands are planted at the top of the halfpipe.

 

 

J-Tear:

Inverted frontside 540 with a hand plant in the middle. Originally a variation on the Jacoby Terror Air. This trick was invented by Mike Jacoby for a contest that didn't allow inverted aerials; inverted handplants, however, were acceptable.

 

 

Double Corks in the Halfpipe:

 

Double Cork:

The general term used to describe all Double flips in the pipe. Also a specific type of Double cork;

 

Double Cork: (failed to be named anything else, because double crippler was already taken)

Initiated with a backward flipping frontside spin, like a crippler with another invert.

 

Double Crippler: (should be called double Back-Barrel Roll, because there is no spinning, only flipping, unlike a single crippler)

Double Back-Barrel Roll off the toes, out of the frontside wall.

 

Double McTwist:

A spinning double flip initiated with a forward flipping backside spin.

 

Double Michalchuk:(aka double-chuk)

A spinning double flip off the heals, initated with a backside spinning wildcat backflip out of the backside wall.

 

Double Backside Rodeo:

A spinning double flip initiated with a backside spinning backflip off the toes, out of the frontside wall.

 

 

Snowboarding Terminology:

This section is being revised and updated. check back soon.